Safety Regulator Proposes New Rule to Help Prevent Deadly Rollover Accidents

by Carmen Dellutri on June 5, 2012

Fort myers accident lawyerAs Fort Myers accident attorneys, we are pleased that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is taking steps to prevent rollover accidents—the deadliest among all crash types. The agency has proposed a new safety standard that would require electronic stability control (ESC) systems on large commercial trucks, motorcoaches, and other large buses for the first time ever.

According to the NHTSA, this technology could prevent up to 56 percent of rollover crashes each year and another 14 percent of loss-of-control crashes. It could also eliminate an estimated 649 to 858 injuries, and prevent between 49 and 60 fatalities a year.

"We've already seen how effective stability control can be at reducing rollovers in passenger vehicles—the ability for this type of technology to save lives is one reason it is required on cars and light-duty trucks beginning with model year 2012," said NHTSA Administrator David Strickland. "Now, we're expanding our efforts to require stability enhancing technology on the many large trucks, motorcoaches, and other large buses on our roadways."

While many truck tractors and large buses can currently be ordered with this technology, the proposed standard would make ESC systems required equipment on these types of vehicles. As proposed, the rule would take effect between two and four years after the standard is finalized, depending on the type of vehicle.

For more on preventing a deadly Fort Myers rollover accident, please see our previous posts.

The Dellutri Law Group is focused on making bad situations better and putting lives back together. If you or someone you love has been seriously injured in a Fort Myers accident caused by someone else’s negligence, you may be entitled to compensation.

To learn more about your legal options, contact our experienced Fort Myers injury attorneys for a free consultation. 

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